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California Climate and Health, Part I: Drought Stirs Up Trouble for State’s Air Quality
By Cameron Scott

The policies that made California a model of how big, developed economies can thrive while safeguarding the environment did not originate in some statewide sense of kumbaya.

They were a desperate response to serious air quality problems in Los Angeles, Bakersfield, and Fresno.

Bad air is a serious drag on public health, driving up rates of cardiovascular disease, cancer, asthma, and death.

California’s efforts to rein in pollution — by requiring smog tests for all cars and trucks and mandating that utilities generate a significant fraction of the power they sell from renewable sources — have delivered decades of improvements in ozone and particulate matter pollution.

But the severe drought the state has weathered the past three years threatens to roll back those gains. Read more >


National Parks Fail EPA Ozone Mandates
By Tori Richards

The EPA's newest ozone pollution threshold has placed 26 national parks at non-compliant levels. But while the rest of the nation's communities must spend billions conforming to the new normal, the parks – including such gems as Sequoia and Rocky Mountain – may be off the hook. The National Park Service blames power plants for much of the problem. But scientists and officials from California say that car emissions – and the tourism that brings $15.7 billion per year to the parks -- are mostly to blame.

"Usually ozone pollution is caused by traffic rather than power plants," said Dr. Saewung Kim, an assistant professor of atmospheric chemistry at the University of California, Irvine. "Power plants have done a great job cleaning up their emissions and ozone-causing pollutants." Read more >


Smoke From Wildfires Is Killing Hundreds of Thousands of People
By Randy Lee Loftis, National Geographic

Dr. Praveen Buddiga knew he would find a packed waiting room when he arrived at his office that warm September day in California’s Central Valley. White flakes drifted from the sky, as if he were inside a snow globe.

The Rough Fire, a 152,000-acre blaze sparked by lightning in the Sequoia National Forest, was lofting thick smoke, soot, and ash into the air—and into the lungs of Buddiga’s patients 35 miles away, in Fresno.

As an allergist, Buddiga knows that wildfires pose a serious, sometimes lethal, threat to people’s health, particularly for those with asthma or heart disease.

“Older [patients] made the universal choking sign—you know, hands around the throat,” Buddiga says. “Younger ones just pointed to their chests. The Rough Fire was devastating for us.” Read more >


Court presses OOIDA on ‘unconstitutionality’ of Calif. emissions regs during oral arguments
By James Jaillet

The court overseeing the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association’s lawsuit against California and its stringent emissions regulations heard oral arguments last week in the case, and, per one report, OOIDA faced tough questions about its suit and the evidence used to support it.

Court documents show the Oct. 22 proceedings occurred, but offer no details on what was said. B2B legal journal Law 360, however, reports a three-judge panel “grilled” the owner-operator advocacy group and its complaint against California’s regulations.

The judges questioned both the jurisdiction of OOIDA’s suit and the court precedents OOIDA’s attorneys are using to backup their claims.

OOIDA’s suit, however, continues its run in court despite being dismissed in court twice in the previous 12 months.

OOIDA originally brought the suit in December 2013, claiming the California Air Resources Board’s Truck & Bus regulation violates the U.S. Constitution’s Commerce Clause. The suit was dismissed in November 2014, but OOIDA was able to revive the case shortly after when one of the owner-operator plaintiffs in the case received a citation for not complying with the state’s emissions regulations. Read more >


The EPA's 'Climate Change Liberation Army'
By Adam Andrzejewski

Why does the EPA need a $715 million police force, a $170 million PR Machine, a nearly $1 billion employment agency for seniors, and a $1.2 billion in-house law firm?

During last week’s Democratic presidential primary debate, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders said the most important adversary of the United States was “climate change.” The EPA is ready for the fight in ways taxpayers haven’t imagined.

Recently, our organization, American Transparency, published our OpenTheBooks Oversight Report – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. We captured and analyzed $110 billion worth of EPA contracts (FY2000-2014), grants (FY2000-2014), salaries (FY2007-2014) and bonuses (FY2000-2014). Read more >


16 ATA Member Fleets Named EPA SmartWay Excellence Award Winners
By Trucking News Staff

The American Trucking Associations (ATA) this week congratulated the 39 winners of the EPA SmartWay Excellence Awards – particularly the 16 members of ATA who were honored here at the ATA Management Conference & Exhibition.

“For more than a decade, SmartWay has been a model of cooperation between industry and government to tackle a serious issue,” ATA President and CEO Bill Graves said. “It is our hope that SmartWay will continue to offer a road map to continued reductions in fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions and I congratulate all the fleets who have already shown tremendous leadership in this arena.”

“EPA is pleased to honor these SmartWay Partners with a 2015 Excellence Award,” said Chris Grundler, director of the EPA Office of Transportation and Air Quality. “SmartWay carriers work diligently to bring our families the goods we need each day, while contributing to a healthier, more sustainable future for our children.” Read more >


Port of Los Angeles has failed to meet pollution-cutting measures
By Tony Barboza

The Port of Los Angeles has failed to carry out vital pollution-reduction measures it agreed to make after a legal settlement more than a decade ago, according to a document released by the port.

In an environmental notice, the port revealed it has not completed 11 of 52 measures it agreed to impose to reduce air pollution, noise and traffic when it allowed the expansion of the China Shipping terminal.

Among the steps not taken are requirements that all ships slow as they approach the port and shut down their diesel engines and plug in to onshore electricity when docked to reduce harmful emissions. Also not met were mandates that trucks and yard tractors be fueled by less-polluting natural gas and other alternative fuels. Read more >


Cutting ozone will require radical transformation of California's trucking industry
By Tony Barboza

At a laboratory in downtown Los Angeles, a big rig spins its wheels on massive rollers as a metal tube funnels its exhaust into an array of air quality sensors. Engineers track the roaring truck's emissions from a bank of computer screens.

The brand-new diesel truck is among the cleanest on the road, the engineers at the California Air Resources Board testing lab say. Even so, its 550-horsepower engine spews out more than 20 times the smog-forming nitrogen oxides of a typical gasoline-powered car — and that won't be good enough for the state to meet stricter federal smog limits adopted this month.

Cutting ozone, the lung-damaging gas in smog, to federal health standards while meeting state targets to cut greenhouse gas emissions will require a radical transformation of California's transportation sector over the next two decades, air quality officials and experts say.

Millions of new electric cars must replace gasoline-powered models. Buses will have to run on hydrogen fuel cells. New technologies and cleaner fuels need to proliferate quickly to slash pollution from trucks, cargo ships and trains. Read more >


U.S. EPA holds trucking company accountable for failure to
install emissions controls on its California fleet
By Karen Caesar, CARB

SAN FRANCISCO—Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that Estes Express Lines will pay a $100,000 penalty
for violations of the California Truck and Bus Regulation, for failing to install particulate filters on 73 of its heavy-duty
diesel trucks (15% of its California fleet).

In California, mobile sources of diesel emissions, such as trucks and construction equipment, are one of the largest sources of
fine particulates. About 625,000 trucks operating in California are registered outside of the state, many are older models
emitting particulates and nitrogen oxides (NOx). The California truck rules are the first of their kind in the nation and will
prevent an estimated 3,500 deaths in California between 2010 – 2025.

The California Truck and Bus Regulation was adopted into federal Clean Air Act plan requirements in 2012 and apply to
privately-owned diesel trucks and buses. The rule also requires any trucking company to ensure their subcontractors are only
using compliant trucks, and requires companies to upgrade their vehicles to meet specific NOx and PM2.5 performance standards in
California. Heavy-duty diesel trucks in California must meet 2010 engine emissions levels or use diesel particulate filters, which
can reduce the emissions of diesel particulate into the atmosphere by 85% or more.

“Trucks represent one of the largest sources of air pollution in California, and the state has the worst air quality in the
nation,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “EPA’s enforcement efforts are aimed at
ensuring all truck fleets operating in California are in compliance with pollution laws.”

“ARB’s partnership to enforce our clean truck and bus regulation with our partners at EPA is vitally important to us,” said ARB
Chair Mary D. Nichols. “It helps bring vehicles that are operating illegally into compliance, and levels the playing field
for those who have already met the requirements.”

In addition to the penalty, Estes will spend $290,400 towards projects to educate the out-of-state trucking industry on the
regulation and for replacing old wood burning devices in the San Joaquin Valley. Estes will pay $35,000 to the University of
California Davis Extension to implement a state-approved training program for out-of-state trucking firms on compliance with the
rule. Estes will also pay $255,400 to the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District’s Burn Cleaner Incentive Program that
will be used to replace 80 or more wood-burning devices with cleaner ones.

Estes is a large, private, for-hire trucking firm based in Virginia that owns and operates diesel-fueled vehicles in all 50
states. In February 2015, EPA issued a Notice of Violation to Estes after EPA’s investigation found that the company failed to
equip its heavy-duty diesel vehicles with particulate filters and failed to verify compliance with the Truck and Bus Regulation for
its hired motor carriers. Estes now operates only new trucks in California.

Fine particle pollution can be emitted directly or formed secondarily in the atmosphere and can penetrate deep into the
lungs and worsen conditions such as asthma and heart disease. Read more >


UC Berkeley scientists measure diesel truck emissions in Caldecott Tunnel
By Charles Fisher

A team of campus researchers is measuring the relative levels of diesel truck emissions passing through Berkeley’s Caldecott Tunnel in an effort to determine the effectiveness of California’s new emissions requirements.

The researchers, a group of scientists from the campus’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have been using a set of cameras, monitors and a research van to gather data that describe the amounts of relative gases and diesel particulate matter emitted by the large trucks.

“We bring a bunch of air pollution analyzers we have in a research van,” said Thomas Kirchstetter, principal investigator for the project, who is also a scientist at the lab and an associate adjunct professor at UC Berkeley. “It’s a mobile laboratory.” Read more >


CWI ISL G Near Zero natural gas engine certified to near zero NOx; 90% below current standard
By Green Car Congress

Cummins Westport Inc. (CWI) announced that its new ISL G Near Zero (NZ) natural gas engine is the first mid-range engine in North America to receive emission certifications from both US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Air Resources Board (ARB) in California that meet the 0.02 g/bhp-hr optional Near Zero NOx Emissions standards for medium-duty truck, urban bus, school bus and refuse applications.

Cummins Westport ISL G NZ exhaust emissions will be 90% lower than the current EPA NOx limit of 0.2 g/bhp-hr and also meet the 2017 EPA greenhouse gas emission requirements. CWI natural gas engines have met the 2010 EPA standard for particulate matter (0.01 g/bhp-hr) since 2001.

Performance and efficiency will match the current ISL G, with engine ratings from 250-320 horsepower, and 660-1,000 lb-ft torque available. Base warranty, extended coverage options, maintenance procedures and service intervals are also the same as the current ISL G. The new engine has similar emission control systems (throttle body injection, TWC, EGR, etc.) as the current 0.20 g/bhp-hr NOx ISL G. Read more >


California supports U.S. EPA action to strengthen national ozone standard
by C.A.R.B.

Just-released ARB strategy to control pollution from cars and trucks puts California on trajectory to meet new standard

SACRAMENTO - The California Air Resources Board supports the U.S. EPA’s decision today to strengthen the national ambient air quality standard for ground-level ozone pollution, bringing the national standard more in line with California’s 10-year-old standard.

Strengthening the standard provides health, environmental and economic benefits for all of California. Science demonstrates that adverse health impacts continue to occur with the previous 8-hour average ozone standard level of 75 parts per billion. The U.S. EPA has now lowered the level of the standard to 70 ppb, making it more health protective.

“We support using the most up-to-date science and recognize that even as the new ozone standard gets tougher to attain California will continue to make progress by employing cleaner technology and fuels,” ARB Chair Mary D. Nichols said. “The new standard will mean a reduction in premature mortality, hospitalizations, emergency room visits for asthma, and lost work and school days. This is especially critical in the South Coast and San Joaquin Valley, where nearly two-thirds of our state’s residents live, including large numbers of people who work outside and who have asthma and other chronic heart and lung diseases.”

ARB’s control programs, together with efforts to reduce air pollution at the local and federal levels, have achieved tremendous success in reducing emissions and providing continued improvement in air quality. The South Coast and San Joaquin Valley are the nation’s only two air basins designated ‘extreme’ nonattainment.

Further reductions are needed to meet the new standard -- and California’s air quality and climate goals. With a standard of 70 ppb, several rural counties likely will fall out of attainment, adding to the state’s existing 16 ozone nonattainment areas. New nonattainment areas are expected to include Amador, Tehama and Tuolumne counties and the Sutter Buttes area.

One of several goals California must meet are the existing ambient ozone air quality standards in 2023 and 2031, which will require an estimated 80 percent reduction in oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions below current emission levels in the South Coast air basin, with substantial reductions needed in the San Joaquin Valley and other nonattainment areas of the state.

New draft strategy released
In a just-released discussion draft of the State’s strategy for its cars and trucks to meet federal air quality standards, the ARB outlines a proposed strategy that continues to build on previous efforts to meet critical air quality and climate goals over the next 15 years. Released Wednesday, the strategy provides a comprehensive foundation for the ongoing transformation of the state’s vehicle fleet putting California on a path to likely meet the new more health-protective federal ozone standard.

The draft strategy (Discussion Draft Mobile Source Strategy) is designed to provide public health protection for the millions of Californians who still breathe unhealthy air and to help California do its part to slow global warming and reduce its dependence on petroleum. In part, the proposed strategy would:
•    Establish requirements for cleaner technologies;
•    Ensure in-use performance over the lifetime of the vehicle;
•    Increase the penetration of zero-emission technologies for cars, trucks and off-road equipment;
•    Require cleaner-burning renewable fuels;
•    Enhance efficiencies in moving people and freight throughout California; and
•    Transform the state’s vehicle fleet using zero- and near-zero-emission technologies in order to help meet California’s air quality and climate change goals.

National low-NOx standard urged
Reducing emissions from heavy-duty trucks – significant contributors to emissions that form ozone -- is an important element of the mobile source strategy. ARB, therefore, urges U.S. EPA to adopt tighter national NOx emissions standards for on-road heavy-duty engines (fueled by either diesel or CNG). NOx, a product of incomplete combustion, contributes to the formation of not only ozone but also fine particle pollution (PM2.5), a serious health threat in California.

ARB will develop new heavy-duty diesel engine emissions standards within the next several years, while simultaneously petitioning U.S. EPA to establish a corresponding national standard, in order to maximize emission reductions from all vehicles operating in California, regardless of whether they were purchased in a different state.

Vehicles purchased outside of California account for one-third of the heavy-duty vehicle miles traveled in the state on any given day. For that reason, a lower NOx standard that reduces emissions from all trucks operating in California is critical to meeting future air quality goals and tackling this public health challenge.
For more information on the new National Ambient Air Quality Standard for Ozone, an ARB fact sheet is available here.



Deadly Diesel Emissions Plummeting in California
Irvin Dawid

Amidst the bad publicity coming from Volkswagen's engineered fraud on diesel emissions testing comes good news from California Air Resources Board: The cancer risk from airborne toxins, most of which come from burning diesel fuel, dropped 76 percent.

"An Air Resources Board study, published (Sept. 21) in the prestigious scientific journal Environmental Science & Technology, shows that the cancer risk from exposure to the state’s most significant air toxics declined 76 percent over a 23-year period in California, a direct result of regulations targeting unhealthful emissions from these air pollutants," writes Melanie Turner for the ARB. Read more >


EPA talks Phase II rollout at TMC
Lucas Deal

It’s been a little more than three months since the EPA and National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) introduced its joint proposed Phase II GHG and fuel economy regulations.

Since then, the trucking industry has been aggressively hunting for more information about the proposed rule.

On that note, Tuesday was a step forward.

During a technical session Tuesday at the Technology and Maintenance Council (TMC) Fall Meeting in Orlando, EPA Representative Matt Spears spoke in detail on how Phase II was written and how the EPA plans to introduce its new regulations in the industry, beginning in 2018. Read more >


Truckers case against CARB continues after ‘exemption’ surfaces
By Laura Urseny, Chico Enterprise-Record

Orland >> A Glenn County Superior Court judge has given a California trucking and business group another month in its case against the California Air Resources Board and diesel particulate filters.

Judge Peter Twede on Friday gave the Alliance for California Business 30 days to file a brief in regards to an exemption CARB says truckers have in regards to the filter.

A state attorney said Friday in court that truckers can file for an exemption if they believe the diesel particulate filter required by the state on older vehicles would cause unsafe conditions in their truck.

While the state attorney said the exemption is well known, alliance attorney Therese Cannata said the alliance has never heard of this exemption. Read more >


Study links California regulations, dramatic declines in cancer risk from exposure to air toxics
By California Air Resources Board

SACRAMENTO - An Air Resources Board study, published today in the prestigious scientific journal “Environmental Science & Technology,” shows that the cancer risk from exposure to the state’s most significant air toxics declined 76 percent over a 23-year period in California, a direct result of regulations targeting unhealthful emissions from these air pollutants.

The study quantifies emission trends for the period from 1990 through 2012 for seven toxic air contaminants (TACs) that are responsible for most of the known cancer risk associated with airborne exposure in California.

“These impressive reductions in California’s most hazardous toxic contaminants in our air took place against a backdrop of more than two decades of steady growth in California, with a growing population, and increasing numbers of cars and trucks that used ever larger quantities of gas and diesel,” Air Resources Board Chair Mary D. Nichols said. “There is no way these improvements in public health would have occurred without a strong, well designed program to reduce public exposure to toxic air pollution.” Read more >


Judge will consider CARB DPF lawsuit Friday
By Charlie Morasch, Land Line contributing writer

A legal action seeking to halt California’s enforcement of its diesel particulate filter regulation could come to a head as soon as Friday, Sept. 18.

Glenn County, Calif., Superior Court Judge Peter Twede is scheduled to hear a motion by the California Air Resources Board to dismiss a legal action brought by a trucking industry veteran and his organization.

The hearing will begin at 1 p.m., and will likely include an audience of interested truckers.

Plaintiffs in the case, the Alliance for California Business, believe DPFs have been the cause of 31 fires or more in the last 18 months, including several in CARB’s drought-worn home state.

The organization is seeking an injunction against the Truck and Bus Rule to prevent its enforcement by CARB. The lawsuit questions the safety of technology used to meet California’s Truck and Bus Rule – a multibillion-dollar rule that has banned trucks with pre-2007 model year engines and required DPFs on virtually all trucks hauling freight in the Golden State. Read more >


There's a Simpler Way to Fight Climate Change, California
By Editorial Board

Say this for California's landmark bill to reduce carbon emissions: It doesn't lack for ambition. At the same time, it shows the pitfalls of relying too much on regulators instead of the market.

The original bill would have set in law three extraordinary targets for 2030: Get half the state's power from renewable sources, double the savings from energy efficiency in California buildings, and cut the amount of gasoline used by half. The state's goal is to reduce emissions by 80 percent by 2050, compared with 1990 levels.

The oil industry lobbied furiously against the mandate to cut fuel use, arguing that it would force the board to ration gasoline or even ban certain types of cars. That argument proved successful: Governor Jerry Brown and Democrats in the state senate said last week they would leave the requirement for cutting gas consumption out of the bill. Read more >


Port of Oakland Opening Gates on Saturday to Reduce Truck CongestionPort of Oakland Opening Gates on Saturday to Reduce Truck Congestion
By: Trucking News Staff

The four international marine container terminals at the Port of Oakland are developing a program to operate terminal gates on Saturdays to reduce weekday congestion at the port. The new program, called OakPass, is expected to begin in the fourth quarter of this year, pending review by the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) and other conditions.

The terminals have submitted a filing to the FMC describing the proposed program. The terminals are currently working to ensure that an adequate supply of labor will be available to operate the new gates. OAKMTOA has established OakPass LLC, a not-for-profit company, to manage the Saturday gate program.

“The Port of Oakland and the four international container terminals agree on the need for additional capacity to reduce congestion and accommodate future volume growth,” said John Cushing, president of OakPass. “After spending well over a year evaluating options including night gates, we determined that adding a Saturday gate is the most practical and cost-effective method to increase capacity in a way that meshes with availability of truck drivers and longshore workers and serves the entire supply chain.”

To help pay for the cost of the new gates, the terminals will begin collecting an Extended Gate Fee (EGF) of $17 per 20-foot equivalent unit (TEU), or $34 on a typical 40-foot container. The EGF will be assessed on loaded import and export containers entering or exiting the terminals between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Read more >


California Drivers Get High Performance Renewable Diesel
By Environment News Service (ENS) 2015

LOS ANGELES, California, August 19, 2015 (ENS) – High performance renewable diesel fuel was introduced to Southern California drivers this week by Propel Fuels, based in Sacramento.

Called Diesel HPR (High Performance Renewable), the fuel is a low-carbon, renewable fuel that meets petroleum diesel specifications and can be used in any diesel engine.

Refined from recycled fats and oils, Diesel HPR does not contain biodiesel or petroleum diesel. It is diesel refined from renewable biomass through Neste’s advanced hydrotreating technology called NEXBTL.

Neste, based in Espoo, Finland, is the leading producer of renewable diesel in the world, with an annual production volume of more than two million tons. The company is the world’s largest producer of renewable fuels from waste and residues. Read more >


OEMs, Cummins disagree on separate GHG engine standard
By Kevin Jones

LONG BEACH, CA. The second public hearing on proposed truck fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions standards shaped up much like the first: Trucking industry representatives expressed qualified support for the stringency goals and implementation schedule outlined by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), while air quality regulators and environmental groups called for tougher restrictions and a tighter timeline. And within trucking there is a divide over exactly how the engine and complete vehicle should be measured.

The big four North American heavy-duty truck manufacturers (Daimler Trucks North America, Navistar, Paccar and Volvo Trucks North America) spoke with one voice Tuesday, as Dan Kieffer, director of emissions compliance for Paccar, delivered a statement on behalf of all.

Calling the Phase II rule “historic in its scope and complexity,” Kieffer noted “a long list of technical and protocol issues” the truck makers will work closely with EPA and the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) to resolve. Read more >


Environmentalists, industry debate proposed new federal clean-truck rules
By Sandy Mazza, Daily Breeze

Environmentalists and trucking industry representatives clashed Tuesday at an all-day hearing in Long Beach on the federal government’s next regulatory phase of diesel truck emissions, which experts say account for 20 percent of greenhouse gases.

With government regulators listening intently, California officials called the emission reduction targets for medium and heavy-duty trucks too lenient, while industry leaders complained they are too restrictive and poorly thought out.

Their arguments were delivered in back-to-back public hearings on the 629-page proposed law drafted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Transportation. The rule, in short, is considered “phase two” of the environmental initiative launched in 2010 by President Barack Obama.

Rep. Grace Napolitano, whose district includes much of the San Gabriel Valley, spoke in favor of stricter rules that would lead to a 40 percent reduction of 2010-level vehicle emissions by 2025.

Read more >


Trucking toward cleaner air: Guest commentary
By Michael Brune

When my parents were kids, our cars didn’t require seatbelts. They remember sitting in the backseat catching air as the car rolled over speed bumps and potholes. But because of American innovation and the desire to keep our families safe, the car I drive my kids around in has airbags on all sides, and endless safety features. And our next car will probably be able to drive itself.

Along with technology that keeps our families safe, our cars are more fuel-efficient than ever before, which means they are safer for our environment. And thanks to more hybrids and electric vehicles on the road and fuel efficiency standards, our passenger cars go further on a gallon of gas than we could even imagine when I was a kid. Or not use any gas at all.

But the heavy-duty trucks driving alongside us haven’t kept pace — in fact, oil use from freight trucks is growing rapidly. While heavy-duty trucks account for only 7 percent of the vehicles on the road, they guzzle a quarter of all fuel. And our tractor trailers are stuck in the 1970s, still averaging roughly 6 miles per gallon. Read more >


California Aims to Regulate Sustainability Into Freight System
by David Cullen

When it comes to rolling out regulations, California leads the nation. Rules written by the Golden State, due to its immense population and gargantuan economic might, tend to be adopted sooner or later by other states and to influence federal rulemaking. This is especially so when it comes to rules aimed at environmental protection and sustainability.

That’s why trucking stakeholders across the country will be keenly watching developments in California that will determine the potentially sweeping impact of a recent proclamation by Gov. Edmund G. ("Jerry") Brown, Jr.

Brown’s Executive Order B-32-15 directs state agencies to craft an “integrated action plan” by next July that would set “clear targets to improve freight efficiency, transition to zero-emission technologies [for cars and trucks] and increase competitiveness of California's freight system.” Read more >


Wind is blowing China's air pollution 'straight across' to the US West Coast
By Barbara Tasch

A new study links the increase in ozone precursor emissions in Asia to increased levels of ozone over the US's West Coast.

In the study, published Monday, a team of six researchers from US and Dutch universities found that ozone concentrations over China increased by about 7% between 2005 and 2010 and that ozone traveling in the air from China has reached the western part of the US, challenging the reduction of ozone levels there.

China's meandering pollution likely offset the 2005-10 reduction in ozone that had been expected following US policies aimed at reducing emissions, by roughly 43%, the researchers found.

Over that period, the US government put in place emission-reducing measures and curbed the production of ozone-forming nitrogen oxides by 20% on the West Coast, according to Wageningen University. Yet that did not improve the quality of the air especially in terms of ozone reduction.

And the increased air pollution in Asia might be at least partly to blame.

Lead researcher Willem Verstraeten of Wageningen University in the Netherlands said in statement that the "dominant westerly winds blew this air pollution straight across to the United States."

He added: "As a manner of speaking, China is exporting its air pollution to the West Coast of America." Read more >


Air pollution from China undermining gains in California, Western states
By Steve Scauzillo, San Gabriel Valley Tribune

Aside from smartphones, toys and computers, China exports a different kind of product into the western United States — air pollution.

A study released Monday by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and NASA found that smog-forming chemicals making their way across the Pacific Ocean from China are undermining the progress California has made in reducing ozone, the most caustic component in L.A. smog.

From 2005 through 2010, western states have cut ozone-forming air pollutants by 21 percent, but the NASA/JPL study found no drop at all when measuring smog-forming gases in the midtroposphere, located 10,000 to 30,000 feet above ground level.

Just under half of what should have been a 2 percent drop was offset by China’s contribution, stemming from a 21 percent rise in ozone-forming pollutants emitted by car tailpipes and coal plants from a robust Chinese economy during the six years studied. Slightly more than half was due to natural causes — stratospheric ozone descending through the sky as a result of cyclical atmospheric winds helped by an El Niño in 2009-2010, the scientists concluded. Read more >



Customer acceptance of upcoming emissions standards at the forefront of Phase II public hearing
By Lucas Deal

As environmentalists and manufacturers shared their thoughts on realistic fuel consumption reduction goals for medium- and heavy-duty engines for next decade, it was ATD Chairman Eric Jorgensen who offered the most likely obstacle to the success of the EPA and NHTSA’s new proposed Phase II regulations during an open public hearing on the regulations Thursday in Chicago.

Speaking on behalf of more than 1,800 truck dealers and as president of JX Enterprises, Jorgensen says the environmental benefits of Phase II won’t be determined by complexity or detail of the ruling—it will be how much it costs to implement it in new trucks.

The desire to reduce fuel consumption and emissions is shared by environmental groups and the trucking industry alike, Jorgensen says, but if Phase II attempts to reduce emissions too drastically it could become cost prohibitive to the end users who will ultimately bear the financial burden of the new technology.
“We need to find the sweet spot,” Jorgensen says. “[Phase II] only works if the trucks are in use,” purchased by end users at reasonable prices, he said. Read more >



First hearing on EPA's Phase 2 truck standards is Thursday in Chicago
By David Tanner, Land Line senior editor

OOIDA says that even though EPA has extended the comment period for its proposed Phase 2 greenhouse gas emissions and fuel economy standards for trucks through Sept. 17, the time is still short for truckers and truck owners to adequately process and comment on provisions that will affect their bottom lines for the next 12 years and beyond. OOIDA aired some preliminary concerns in a letter to EPA and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration officials on Wednesday, July 29.

OOIDA leadership acknowledges that a short extension for public comments granted by the Environmental Protection Agency will last 30 days beyond the second of two scheduled public hearings in regards to the agency’s proposed Phase 2 standards for greenhouse gas emissions and fuel economy for heavy-duty trucks. However, the Association is concerned that the time frame for comments on a proposal that stands to add $10,000 to $13,000 to the price of new trucks by 2027 requires proper analysis and vetting by the stakeholders the proposal stands to affect.

“This is an extremely complex proposal, and a longer comment period ensures that OOIDA and other stakeholders, as well as our membership of small-business owners and professional truck drivers, have ample opportunity to review the proposal and comment,” OOIDA leadership stated in the letter, signed by Association Executive Vice President Todd Spencer.

“While extending the comment period 30 days beyond the last planned public meeting is a laudable decision, it does not adequately provide for sufficient time.” Read more >


Opinion: California’s Zero-Emissions Plan on the Horizon
By Shawn Yadon; CEO California Trucking Association

This year, the freight movement sector will be facing the development of new emissions rules affecting trucking, warehousing and distribution centers in California. Through legislative approaches, executive orders and other regulatory measures currently in development, a slew of new compliance concerns are just around the corner. Since the early years of the 21st century, California has greatly reduced community health risks from freight emissions. As a result, the trucking industry — three-fourths of which is made up of small family-owned businesses — has cut particulate matter emissions by 99% by investing more than $7 billion in clean truck technologies. This number alone is equivalent to taking 1.4 million cars off the road. However, on July 17, California Gov. Jerry Brown issued a proclamation calling for a new wave of regulations on the freight movement industry, which accounts for one-third of the state’s economy and jobs. Read more >


California group suing CARB believes 31 fires have been caused by DPF
By Charlie Morasch, Land Line contributing writer

A coalition of businesses and truck owners who are suing the California Air Resources Board believe a recent rash of roadside fires is part of a larger trend – diesel particulate filters failing the very environment they were designed to protect.

The Alliance for California Business believes DPFs have started as many as 31 fires in the last 18 months, including several in CARB’s drought worn home state.

Bud Caldwell, the organization’s president and owner of 11 trucks, says multiple fires in recent weeks appear to be the result of fires that started below the truck’s engine compartment.

“But nobody investigates fires unless there is a death,” Caldwell told Land Line.

Caldwell pointed to multiple fires along California highways during the last year, including four separate fires believed to be set by a single truck on July 6 and fire from one truck spreading to two others at a Natomas, Calif., truck stop last November. Read more >


Navistar Inc. fined $250,000 for violating state air emissions regulations
By C.A.R.B.

SACRAMENTO - Navistar Inc. paid $250,000 in penalties to the Air Resources Board for failing to follow proper testing procedures for one of its diesel exhaust filters, as required by state law.

“Companies that are in the business of providing pollution control technology for vehicles must make sure that their products actually do what they say they will do,” said ARB’s new Enforcement Chief, Todd Sax. “Navistar sold diesel particulate filters in California without proper testing at specified intervals, in violation of our air quality laws. To their credit, once they were notified of these infractions, they took prompt action and cooperated fully with ARB.”

The state’s Verification Procedure requires compliance testing for each category of diesel particulate filters after a certain number of units are sold or leased in the California market. Results of these tests must be submitted to ARB’s Executive Officer after each phase of testing in the form of a compliance report.

Navistar. failed to follow the in-use compliance requirements of the Verification Procedure for the DPX™ Catalyzed Soot Filter System. The company had sold more than 200 in California, with many installed on school buses in the San Diego County region, which should have triggered the required testing.

Illinois-based Navistar has agreed to follow all required procedures and paid $187,500 to the Air Pollution Control Fund to support air quality research, and $62,500 to the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District to clean up school bus fleets throughout the state.

Diesel exhaust contains a variety of harmful gases and more than 40 other known cancer-causing compounds. In 1998, California identified diesel particulate matter as a toxic air contaminant based on its potential to cause cancer, premature death and other health problems. Read more >


EPA Sues Navistar, Says Some 2010 Engines Were Illegal
By Tom Berg

Navistar Inc.’s 2009-2010 “transition” strategy for exhaust-emissions compliance has led to a lawsuit filed on Wednesday by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

EPA claims 7,750 Navistar diesels sold in International trucks during 2010 were not true 2009 models, and without formal exemptions, they were illegal.

The suit is the latest development resulting from the company's tried but failed strategy to use a less costly method to meet emissions limits. It was temporarily helped by EPA in an emergency ruling that allowed continued production of the engines while Navistar continued to work on its technology. That ruling was challenged by competitors and thrown out by a federal judge. Read more >


How to Get Started as an Owner Operator in the Trucking Industry
Written by SayCampusLife Admin

Being a truck driver offers plenty of benefits, including job security and competitive wages. But you can really boost your earning power by taking things to the next level by becoming an owner operator.

Develop a business plan. You’ll essentially be in business for yourself, so you’ll have to come up with a business plan pertinent to your niche, and determine your estimated cash flow, expenses, start-up costs, and so forth. Make sure this plan is thorough, as you’ll have to refer to it when you apply for financing to get your business up and running.

Identify the employment potential for owner operators in your area. Get in touch with the local industry and large firms that use owner operators. Search our website for employment opportunities with either a price or a bidding range offered. Make sure you can easily get a gig before you invest in your truck.

Buy the right truck you can afford. Identify the niche you’ll be in, and shop around for the appropriate truck. Scope out a number of dealers and financing options, and understand the type of maintenance that will be needed.

Buy insurance that will cover your vehicle. There is significant liability in the trucking industry, so you’ll have to make sure that the insurance policy you purchase will adequately cover your vehicle. The prices will range quite a bit, so make sure to take your time in the shopping process.

Hire an accountant to take care of the books. You’ll be spending all your time working, so leave it to the professionals to take care of all your tax forms and invoices for you. Your accountant will also be able to help you track your expenses, which is important to keep your budget intact.

Learn to do basic maintenance on your truck. You can save yourself a lot of money performing basic maintenance like changing tires rather than always relying on a mechanic. Read more >


Judge dismisses most of OOIDA lawsuit against CARB, transfers owner-op’s claim
By James Jaillet

The federal judge overseeing the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association’s lawsuit challenging California emissions standards has again dismissed most of the owner-driver advocacy group’s litigation.

U.S. District Judge Morrison England issued the ruling last week. He also transferred the remaining elements of the case to a larger federal appellate court.

OOIDA’s 2013 lawsuit against the California Air Resources Board and some of its members, challenging the Constitutionality of the state’s tough emissions regulations, was dismissed in full in November of last year. But a citation issued to one of the owner-operator plaintiffs in the case allowed OOIDA to revive it and bring its claims back to court. Read more >


Federal Regulators Formally Publish Phase 2 GHG Emissions-Reduction Proposal
By Transport Topics © , American Trucking Associations Inc.

Federal regulators on July 13 formally published their proposal in the Federal Register that would tighten greenhouse-gas emissions for trucks, improve their fuel economy and regulate trailer efficiency for the first time. Details of the Phase 2 joint proposed rule were first announced June 19 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The proposal would phase in more stringent standards for heavy- and medium-duty trucks from 2021 through 2027. The more than 1,000-page main proposal includes separate standards for engines and vehicles. Read more >


This 100 Percent Electric Eighteen-Wheeler Just Hit The Road In Germany
by Ari Phillips

On Tuesday, an all-electric tractor-trailer hit the road in Munich, Germany — the first time such a large electric vehicle made by a European manufacturer has gone into regular service in Europe, according to BMW, the company behind the project.

The 40-ton truck has a range of about 62 miles per charge, which takes three or four hours. Its first deployment will entail transporting vehicle components — such as shock absorbers, springs and steering systems — over stretches of less than two miles across Munich seven times a day.

Developed by BMW Group and the SCHERM group, a German automotive service provider, the big rig is a model from the Dutch manufacturer Terberg. According to the companies, the truck is “CO2-free, quiet and generates almost no fine particle pollution.” They also state that compared to a standard diesel engine truck, the electric truck will save 11.8 tons of carbon dioxide per year — the equivalent of the emissions produced by driving one of BMW’s more efficient cars, which gets an average of 60 miles per gallon, around the world almost three times. Read more >


California Coalition to Promote Benefits of Natural Gas Trucks
by NGT News

Southern California Gas Co. (SoCalGas) says it is teaming up with the California Trucking Association (CTA) to help expand awareness of the economic and environmental benefits of natural gas as a transportation fuel for heavy-duty trucking and goods movement.

"SoCalGas is pleased to join with the California Trucking Association to help its members learn more about the many ways natural gas fueling and clean natural gas engine technologies can help them save money, clean up our air and mitigate the environmental impact of goods movement," states Rodger Schwecke, vice president of customer solutions for SoCalGas. Read more >


Bosch: Emissions – How diesel affects air quality
By Automotive World

Bosch explains why diesel is crucial to achieving CO2 targets, how to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, and what impact smokers and tires have on emissions of particulate matter

Paris, London, Stuttgart – air quality is at the focus of debate all over Europe – a debate that often centers on diesel engines.
Air quality is at the focus of debate all over Europe – a debate that often centers on diesel engines. “In Bosch’s view, it’s important to base the air quality debate on facts,” says Dr. Rolf Bulander, chairman of the Mobility Solutions business sector. Read more >


Trucking Industry Faces Stricter Fuel Efficiency Standards
By Lauren Gardner

Medium- and heavy-duty fleet trucks would have to meet stricter fuel efficiency standards under a proposal by federal environmental and highway regulators, part of the Obama administration’s effort to reduce climate-warming pollution across the economy.

The standards proposed on June 19 would cut greenhouse gas emissions by about 1 billion metric tons over the life of the nation’s fleet, agencies said.

That’s roughly equivalent to the pollution linked to electricity use by all U.S. households for one year. The standards — covering tractor trailers and the largest vans and pickup trucks — would begin in the 2021 model year and be applied through model year 2027.

For trailers, the standards would take effect in the 2018 model year.

The transportation sector is the second-largest contributor to the U.S. carbon footprint, after the utility industry, according to the EPA. Medium- and heavy-duty trucks emit about 20 percent of the sector’s carbon pollution while accounting for just 5 percent of the vehicles on the road. Read more >


Moreno Valley warehouse project raising concerns over air quality
By Jim Steinberg, The Sun

MORENO VALLEY >> A master planned warehouse development that would fill nearly 700 football fields has raised concerns among state and regional air quality regulators, the Riverside County Transportation Commission and the American Lung Association.

The proposed World Logistics Center — with its 40.6 million square feet of warehouses and 14,000 daily truck visits — is planned for construction east of Moreno Valley and south of the 60 Freeway. Construction of the $3 billion project is expected to take 15 years.

“This project is so large that it will have consequences for the region,” said Ronald Loveridge, who is director of the UC Riverside Center for Sustainable Suburban Development and former longtime mayor of Riverside.

The project is coming up for approval at a time real estate professionals say the combined San Bernardino and Riverside county area is experiencing its third and largest warehouse building boom. Read more >


Trucking Companies Try New Approach at Congested California Ports
By Erica E. Phillips

LOS ANGELES—A handful of companies are betting the days of truck drivers owning their own vehicles is coming to an end.

Operating primarily in Southern California, the firms are buying trucks and employing drivers full time to haul goods the short distance between ports and nearby rail yards and warehouses, a key link in the national supply chain known as drayage trucking.

The new outfits include a startup backed by private equity firm Saybrook Capital LLC and others that converted from independent contractor models, where drivers own or lease their own trucks. While all-employee drayage companies account for less than 5% of the more than 10,000 drivers at Southern California ports, that’s double their share a year ago, according to the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which is working to organize the employee drivers. Read more >


Study: Fireworks cause a toxic brew of unhealthy air
by Shannon Rae Green

The thousands of Fourth of July fireworks celebrations across the nation bring a toxic brew of air pollution to our atmosphere, according to a recent study from federal scientists.

The exploding fireworks unleash tiny particles — about 1/30th the diameter of a typical human hair — that can affect health because they travel deep into a person's respiratory tract, entering the lungs.

The tiny particles are known as "particulate matter" and include dust, dirt, soot, smoke and liquid droplets and are measured in micrometers, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. A micrometer is one-millionth of a meter. Read more >


Trucking Speeds Ahead as Fastest-Growing Small Business Industry
by Benjamin Pimentel

Those big rigs you see rumbling down the freeway are a sign of good times.

Trucking is now the fastest-growing small-business industry in the U.S., thanks to a robust economy and expanded options for small-business loans and financing.

Two kinds of small businesses in trucking posted the biggest jumps in revenue in the 12-month period ending May 31, according to a report released this month by Sageworks, a financial analysis software company.

General freight trucking, which covers small businesses that transport a wide range of merchandise, was at No. 1, recording a nearly 25% uptick in sales, the report said. Read more >


‘No Idling’ Regs Coming to Commerce
By Jacqueline Garcia, EGP Staff Writer

Diesel burning trucks idling for long periods is a problem in the City of Commerce. On Tuesday, city officials, residents and local environmental groups unveiled the city’s latest effort to try to curtail the practice: 20 new “No Idling” signs to be installed in areas where truck drivers tend to stop off for a while but keep their engines running.

The new signs were created in partnership with East Yard Communities for Environmental Justice, the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) and the California Environmental Protection Agency, (CalEPA) and are meet new new regulations set by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) regarding the idling of commercial vehicles.

The new regulations require “No Idling” signs to be placed at locations where significant numbers of idling trucks have been found. Read more >


EPA, DOT release proposal for next phase of emissions, fuel economy standards, set to take effect 2018
By Matt Cole

The EPA and DOT announced Friday their plans for Phase 2 of the Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles.

Phase 2 of the program would “significantly reduce carbon emissions and improve fuel efficiency of heavy-duty vehicles, helping to address the challenges of global climate change and energy security,” according to the EPA.

The proposed standards will begin in model year 2018 for trailers and 2021 for tractors and culminate in vehicle-wide — engine, truck and trailer — standards for model year 2027 vehicles.

The EPA said the proposed plan will cut GHG emission by approximately 1 billion metric tons and conserve about 1.8 billion barrels of oil over the lifetime of the vehicles sold during the program. Read more >


America's Trucking Industry May Become a Bit Less Dirty
By VICE News

The US government proposed on Friday new rules to limit emissions from big, heavy-duty trucks and long-haul tractor trailers — a move that underscored the Obama administration's commitment towards fighting climate change.

The new emission standards would apply to a wide range of vehicles, from the largest pickup trucks and vans to semi-trucks, as well as trailers, and would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by about 1 billion metric tons and conserve about 1.8 billion barrels of oil over the lifetime of the vehicles sold, according to the joint guidelines from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

The proposed rules hold the potential to significantly cut US emissions: The transportation sector is the second largest contributor, accounting for about 27 percent of the nation's carbon pollution. Yet, the trucking industry is weary of the costs of implementing the proposed rules, which the public has 30 days in which to submit comments, but it also sees potential savings in improved fuel efficiency. Read more >


Proposed Rule for Big Trucks Aims at Cutting Fuel Emissions

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration on Friday introduced a major climate change regulation intended to reduce planet-warming carbon pollution from heavy-duty trucks.

The rule, issued by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Transportation Department, is the latest in a march of pollution constraints that President Obama has put forth on different sectors of the economy as he seeks to make tackling climate change a cornerstone of his legacy.

The proposed rule is meant to increase the fuel efficiency of the vast rigs that haul goods as varied as steel, timber and oil, as well as packages from The regulations will also set emissions targets for other types of trucks larger than light-duty pickups, like delivery vehicles, dump trucks and buses. Read more >


Pope's climate change encyclical could sway U.S. opinion: scientists
By Mary Wisniewski

Some U.S. scientists are expressing hope that Pope Francis' encyclical on global warming embracing the view that it is mostly caused by human activities will change public opinion in the United States, where the issue is highly politicized.

Texas Tech University climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe said the pope's document is important because more facts alone will not convince climate change skeptics.

"We have to connect these issues with our values," said Hayhoe, who described herself as an evangelical Christian.

Some U.S. scientists are expressing hope that Pope Francis' encyclical on global warming embracing the view that it is mostly caused by human activities will change public opinion in the United States, where the issue is highly politicized.

Texas Tech University climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe said the pope's document is important because more facts alone will not convince climate change skeptics.

"We have to connect these issues with our values," said Hayhoe, who described herself as an evangelical Christian. Read more >


Study finds truck fleet clean-up dramatically decreases engine emissions near Port of Oakland
BY Karen Caesar

Black carbon and oxides of nitrogen down 76 percent and 53 percent, respectively, in four years

SACRAMENTO - A study funded by the California Air Resources Board demonstrates that mandatory upgrades to diesel truck fleets serving the Port of Oakland are responsible for significant reductions in two major air pollutants.

According to research conducted by Berkeley scientist Robert Harley and based on data collected from thousands of trucks near the Port of Oakland, emissions of black carbon, a key component of diesel particulate matter and a pollutant linked to global warming, was slashed 76 percent from 2009 to 2013. Emissions of oxides of nitrogen, which leads to smog, declined 53 percent. Also during this period, the median age of truck engines declined from 11 to six years, and the percentage of trucks equipped with diesel particulate filters increased from 2 percent to 99 percent.

Dr. Harley will elaborate on these results during an ARB-hosted research seminar and webcast open to the public at 1:30 pm (PDT) on Thursday, June 18. More information can be found here at this link

The webinar will be archived on ARB’s website.

The study findings are considered dramatic because they occurred over a relatively short time. Comparable emissions reductions could normally take up to a decade through gradual replacement of old trucks or natural fleet turnover.

In this case, the improvements are attributed to the ARB’s Drayage Truck Regulation and to the Comprehensive Truck Management Program at the Port of Oakland, which require vehicle owners serving the port to clean up their trucks by either replacing them with newer models or installing diesel particulate

Diesel trucks are one of California’s biggest sources of air pollution. Because they are so durable, they can operate for decades and emit significant amounts of diesel pollution unless they are retrofit with filters or replaced.

Adopted in 2007, the ARB’s Drayage Truck Regulation requires all trucks serving major California ports and intermodal rail yards to be registered and upgraded according to a staggered implementation schedule. By Jan. 1, 2023, all class 7 and 8 diesel-fueled drayage trucks must have 2010 or newer engines.
Currently, pre-2007 model year (MY) trucks cannot serve the ports. All 2007-2009 MY trucks are compliant through 2022.

Diesel exhaust contains a variety of harmful gases and more than 40 other known cancer-causing compounds. In 1998, California identified diesel particulate matter as a toxic air contaminant based on its potential to cause cancer, premature death and other health problems.


More Isn’t Always Better
BY Matt Schrap

EPA to propose stricter Phase 2 GHG Standards for new HD engines
There seems to be little respite for the heavy duty trucking industry when it comes to emissions reductions in this day and age. While California toys with the idea of a zero-emission, all-electric fleet, the Feds have again thrown down the gauntlet in their efforts to squeeze additional Greenhouse Gas (GHG) reductions from the heavy duty trucking fleet via “Phase 2” new engine standards to take effect in 2027.

While some regulators and politicians have described the industry as a “necessary evil”, industry members themselves are passionate defenders of their work, pointing to the fact the vast majority of Americans would be “naked and starving” if the trucking industry stopped moving.

Of course, no one in the industry wants to stop moving and they especially don’t want their customers naked or starving. That brings us to a crossroads; the economy needs the industry to help maintain and grow economic activity and the industry needs a strong economy to maintain and grow the industry, it is a symbiotic relationship. As goes trucking, so goes the economy. The industry is the proverbial canary in the coal mine when it comes to the economic health of the country. Read more >


Don't give CARB more power to punish drivers

At the same time that Californians want clean energy, they want it to be affordable and reliable. Wind does not always blow, the sun does not always shine, and these sources are more expensive than traditional ones.

The unanswered question of affordability is a major flaw in Senate Bill 350, which is part of a broader legislative package that attempts to address climate change. The Senate recently approved SB350 without bipartisan support; it’s now before the Assembly. Read more >


New U.S. truck emissions rules could touch off industry struggle
By Nick Carey

CHICAGO (Reuters) - U.S. environmental regulators are expected within days to propose rules to make trucks more fuel efficient, and trucking industry executives and lobbyists familiar with the process said the rules will probably call for boosting fuel efficiency by 2027 nearly 40 percent from 2010 levels.

Truckers say the industry is willing to accept tighter federal standards, since motor fuel accounts for about a third of its costs. Truckers also want consistent standards throughout the country instead of a separate state rule in California.

But various segments of the trucking industry disagree about how federal rules should be structured and implemented. So the Environmental Protection Agency proposal for heavy trucks could prompt an intramural struggle to influence the final regulations. Read more >


Air quality rules tightened after cancer risk found to be 3 times higher
By Tony Barboza

Dozens of Southern California facilities, including oil refineries, aerospace plants and metal factories, will face new requirements to reduce toxic emissions or notify their neighbors of the health risks from their operations under rules approved Friday by air quality officials.

The move by the South Coast Air Quality Management District governing board follows new guidelines from state environmental officials that estimate the cancer risk from toxic air contaminants is nearly three times what experts previously thought.  Read more >


For truck drivers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, it's a waiting game
by Brian Watt

More than 40 percent of U.S. imports flow through the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. An army of 14,000 short-haul truck drivers are tasked with hauling that cargo from the port complex to warehouses and rail yards around Southern Calfornia. But some of those truckers say, despite their critical role at the ports, they are among the lowest paid workers there, due to ridiculously long wait times.

There are an estimated 14,000 truck drivers operating in the port complex. They collectively move, on average, 11,000 cargo-filled containers each day, according to numbers from the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. Their ability to make a good living depends on how they are classified - and there are haves, and have-nots. Read more >


Big Trucks Emit Huge Amounts Of Carbon Every Year. The EPA Is About To Do Something About It.
by Katie Valentine

The Environmental Protection Agency is expected to propose new standards for heavy-duty trucks this week, regulations aimed at reducing carbon emissions from tractor trailers and other big trucks.

It’s not yet known exactly what cuts the proposed regulations will call for, but according to the New York Times, the rule will likely require heavy trucks — like tractor trailers, buses, and garbage trucks — to increase their fuel economy by up to 40 percent compared to 2010 levels by 2027. Right now, the Times reports, a tractor trailer averages just five to six miles per gallon of diesel fuel. This rule could raise that to as much as nine mpg. Read more >
Potential fuel savings in heavy-duty trucks.
Read more >




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